fbpx
Integrative Family Health Clinic in Bolton and the Greater Caledon Area
4-22 Simona Drive
Bolton, ON
four stages of menopause wildflower health and wellness clinic

Is This Menopause? The Stages of Menopause

Menopause is a milestone of women’s health. But how do you know if you’re going through menopause (perimenopause) or have passed it (post-menopause)? Learn more about how menopause is diagnosed and how you can support yourself through this phase naturally.

Quick Facts

      • There are four stages that women go through: Pre-menopause, perimenopause, menopause, and post-menopause
      • Menopausal symptoms occur as a natural shift in hormone production with age
      • There are ways to support your hormones naturally to promote a smooth transition from one hormonal phase to the next 

What are the female hormones and what do they do?

There are two major female hormones: 

Hormone Produced By Function
Estrogen Mainly by the ovaries, to a lesser extent by the adrenal glands and fat cells Effects include regulating the menstrual cycle; maintaining: muscles and connective tissue, heart and blood vessels, brain, bones, skin, and hair.
Progesterone Mainly by the corpus luteum in the ovaries, to a lesser extent by the adrenal glands Prepares the uterine lining for pregnancy; maintaining pregnancy; and supporting thyroid function, mood, and breastmilk production.

Source: Johns Hopkins Medicine, Cleveland Clinic

The stages of menopause

There are generally four stages of female hormones in a woman’s lifetime: 

      1. Premenopause: This is the period of time when both estrogen and progesterone are sufficient in levels to produce regular menstrual cycles and to support a potential pregnancy.
      2. Perimenopause: This means “around menopause,” which begins when periods become less regular, typically around a woman’s 40s. 
      3. Menopause: This stage starts from the last menstrual period until the post-menopausal stage, 12 months later. This stage is typically when menopausal symptoms like hot flashes and sleeplessness are most intense. 
      4. Post-menopause: This stage comes after 12 consecutive months without a period. 

What happens during menopause?

During perimenopause, the ovaries down-shift their production of estrogen and progesterone. When levels of these hormones are no longer optimal to produce a regular menstrual cycle, menopause starts, and so can the symptoms of menopause.

Typical symptoms that occur during menopause as a result of these hormonal changes are: 

      • hot flashes
      • sleeplessness
      • low energy
      • low libido
      • vaginal dryness
      • night sweats
      • weight gain
      • bloating 
      • mood changes

Although these symptoms are common, they’re not normal, and there are ways to support your hormonal transition without experiencing intense symptoms that disrupt your day-to-day life. 

Treatment options for menopause

Treatment starts with proper assessment of your hormone levels, understanding your body’s ideal hormone levels, and how to manage your symptoms as you go through menopause. 

Depending on your case, your healthcare provider may suggest one or a combination of the following:

      • Hormone replacement therapy
      • Lifestyle modifications
      • Stress management
      • Natural remedies, such as botanical medicines
      • Other supportive therapies, such as acupuncture

You don't have to go through menopause or perimenopause alone.

Wildflower clinicians are here to support you through a comfortable transition through menopause.

5 easy tips for better digestion

Digestion can be over complicated or very simple to deconstruct. Before you diagnose yourself with some rare digestive disease by Dr. Google give these easy tips a try!

Chew your food

Digestion starts in the mouth! Even as you’re reading this and thinking of cookies your mouth is salivating. Saliva is a combination of enzymes, electrolytes and proteins that start the process of digestion before food even gets into the stomach. Chewing physically makes your food into smaller pieces and also allows for saliva to be mixed into the food.

[bt_highlight]Solution: [/bt_highlight] You don’t need to count the amount of chewing per bite but the food should be mush before you swallow.

 

Relaxed eating

The process of digestion is most effective when you are in a relaxed mood. Relaxed eating engages the rest-and-digest nervous system (aka parasympathetic nervous system) which allows your stomach to release digestive enzymes.

[bt_highlight]Solution: [/bt_highlight] Limit eating on the go, take a seat, look at your food and chew slowly!

 

Thirst – hunger signals

It’s a well known phenomenon that hunger and thirst signals can get crossed in your brain. Your hypothalamus, the portion of your brain responsible for controlling feelings of hunger and thirst, responds similarly whether you’re thirsty or if you haven’t had enough to eat. Meaning that you may feel hungry when you’re actually thirsty. Many of us are over eating and under hydrating as a result.

[bt_highlight]Solution:[/bt_highlight] When you feel hungry drink 1/2-1 glass of water. If after 20 minutes you’re still hungry then grab a bite to eat! If the hunger dissipated it means that you were actually thirsty/dehydrated and you should up your daily water intake.

 

Meal timing

Body hack: your digestion works best when it runs on a schedule. Your brain and digestive organs are connected enough to figure out when to expect meals and therefore when to send out the digestive juices. This is why many people report that they get acid reflux when they eat late at night or that they have bloating after meals.

[bt_highlight]Solution: [/bt_highlight] Try your best to eat your meals at the same time everyday!

 

Understand your GI transit time

The time it takes food to go from into your mouth and out the other end is called the GI transit time. Optimal digestion takes between 12-24 hours. Anything more or less can tell us whether you are absorbing nutrient and if toxins are properly eliminated.

[bt_highlight]Solution: [/bt_highlight] Here’s how to test your bowel transit time.

Eat a large serving of beets (at least 1 cup of cooked beets)
Record when you ate the beets
Over the next hours check your stool! When you notice your stool is the colour of the red beets, you’ve figured out your transit time.

More than 24 hours: A transit time that exceeds 24 hours may mean your bowels are not eliminating and stool is sitting in your colon for too long. This can lead to a toxic bowel, which can eventually lead to colon disease and a body that is overloaded with toxins. You may need more fibre (from sources like fruits, vegetables, chia and ground flaxseeds), water, relaxation techniques, and daily movement to get your bowels moving regularly. Additionally , your nutritionist or naturopathic doctor can recommend specific dosages of key digestive supplements where necessary.

Less than 12 hours: This is less common but can mean that you’re not really absorbing all the nutrients from your food or you could have too many stimulants in your daily life, like coffee.

 

Bottom line

You need to do the basics before your health practitioner considers any other functional disease. If you’re already doing these simple tips and still experiencing digestive issues then you may need further testing. Food sensitivity or GIMAP tests are a functional medicine approach to treat many digestive concerns. Speak to your naturopathic doctor for more options.

Seasonal Affective Disorder

As the seasons change, so do many other parts of our lives. We switch our wardrobes from tank tops to sweaters, we replace our vases of daisies with sunflowers, and we see the start of a new school year. For many Canadians, the change in seasons also brings a change in mood and mental health. Why do 2-3 percent of people feel more down in the fall and winter months? And what is Seasonal Affective Disorder? Keep reading to find out.

What is SAD?

Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD) is a type of depression that arises annually at the same time of year. It usually occurs in the fall and winter months, however some people also experience it in the summer months. SAD must occur annually for more than two years in a row to be considered more than just the occasional low mood around the holidays. 

What are the Symptoms of SAD?

The symptoms of Major Depressive Disorder are identical to the symptoms of Seasonal Affective Disorder. The only difference is the duration and when the symptoms start and end. SAD symptoms typically begin as the seasons change from summer to fall and end when they change from winter to spring. 

Here are the most common symptoms of SAD:

  • Sadness that occurs most of the day and for at least two weeks straight
  • Appetite and weight loss or gain
  • Insomnia or excessive sleep
  • Withdrawal from activities usually enjoyed, including socialization
  • Feelings of hopelessness and despair
  • Irritability and agitation
  • Low self-esteem
  • Hallucinations and delusions

Suicidal ideation is another common symptom that must be taken seriously and immediately addressed. If you or someone you know is having suicidal thoughts, contact Crisis Services Canada.

What are the Risk Factors for SAD?

There are multiple theories about what causes SAD. It’s generally agreed that SAD is related to sunlight levels and sleep patterns. 

In Canada and many other parts of the world, our daylight hours decline during the fall and winter months. At night, the brain produces a hormone called melatonin which promotes sleep and drowsiness. With less sunlight in the fall and winter, the brain produces more melatonin which affects your mood and energy levels. This also affects your circadian rhythm, increasing fatigue and either increasing or decreasing the amount of sleep you get. 

Another possible theory is the decline in serotonin the brain produces in the fall and winter. Serotonin is a neurotransmitter that affects your mood and energy levels. Studies show that serotonin turnover in the brain and serotonin production are lowest in the winter months, which means it could play a significant role in triggering SAD. 

CAMH lists additional risk factors for experiencing SAD. They include being female, living farther north or south of the equator, being a young person, and having a family history of depression. Having pre-existing mental conditions such as substance addiction and eating disorders may increase your likelihood of developing Seasonal Affective Disorder. 

COVID-19 and Seasonal Affective Disorder

The pandemic has caused immense stress, and has even led to a spike in Canadians with anxiety and depression. This is not surprising as COVID-19 has caused people to lose their jobs temporarily and permanently putting many people’s financial security at risk. That coupled with the inability to spend time in person with loved ones and children’s inability to socialize at school has contributed to increased depression and anxiety. 

With the winter months around the corner, it would not be surprising to also see higher numbers of Seasonal Affective Disorder across the board. The holidays are already stressful for many, and with the threat of spreading the virus making people hesitate before they gather with family, it could become even more stressful. 

This year more than ever, it will be important for Canadians to prioritize their mental health with self-care, awareness, and proactive prevention of depression. 

Seasonal Affective Disorder Diagnosis

Getting diagnosed with Seasonal Affective Disorder is nearly identical to the process of getting diagnosed with depression. Your physician or health care provider will ask you a series of questions regarding your mood, energy levels, other symptoms, and your thoughts. They may perform tests to rule out other conditions, but can ultimately diagnose you with SAD based on your answers to their questions. 

How To Treat Seasonal Affective Disorder

There are several different treatment options for SAD, some with more reported effectiveness than others. It’s best to follow your health care provider’s recommendations for treatment. 

One of the most effective and widely known forms of treatment is light therapy. As mentioned above, the lack of sunlight in the fall and winter affects our brain chemicals and circadian rhythms. Studies have shown that exposing people living with SAD to Bright Light Therapy (BLT) can effectively reduce and treat their depression. 

What does BLT involve? Usually, patients will sit in front of a fluorescent light source that mimics sunlight for a set amount of time each day. For some, 30 minutes in front of this light source is enough to act as an antidepressant for their depression. Times range from 30 minutes to 2 hours daily for 2-4 weeks to see results. However, there are some side effects including eye strain, nausea, and headaches. 

Other effective treatments for SAD include a combination of medication, psychotherapy, and self-care activities. It’s recommended that patients try to spend more time outdoors during the daytime to increase their serotonin and dopamine levels, as well as increase their intake of vitamin D. 

Some self-care activities to increase in the fall and winter months are:

  • Exercising  
  • Socializing (socially distanced and virtual)
  • Mindfulness
  • Relaxation and laughter
  • Speaking to a therapist

You may also want to review your diet to see if any crucial nutrients are missing from it which could be affecting your mood. 

How We Can Help

Wildflower Health and Wellness is excited to announce the opening of our Natural Dispensary. We offer high quality medicinal dried herbs, herbal tinctures, and professional line supplements all of which are certified clean. Contact us today to refill your supplements – including melatonin and vitamin D3.

Prevent cardiovascular disease

Heart Health 101: How to Prevent Cardiovascular Disease

In Canada, the second leading cause of death is cardiovascular disease. The prevalence of heart disease is high, and Canadians need to be aware of the causes as well as prevention methods. Keep reading for everything you need to know about how to prevent cardiovascular disease.

What is Heart Disease?

A heart disease is a condition that affects the heart’s ability to function. Specifically, one of the most common heart diseases is cardiovascular disease in which the arteries or blood vessels stiffen or become blocked by plaque. As a result, the narrowing of the arteries and blood vessels can lead to stroke, angina, heart attack, and death. 

What Causes Cardiovascular Disease?

There are numerous risk factors that can cause someone to develop cardiovascular disease. They fall into three categories: lifestyle, genetic, and medical conditions. 

  • Risk factors associated with your lifestyle include smoking tobacco, drinking excessive amounts of alcohol, unhealthy weight, and stress. 
  • Some genetic risk factors include being male (men are twice as likely as women to suffer a heart attack), being an older age, and having a family history of heart disease.
  • Medical conditions that put you at risk for heart disease include having high blood pressure, diabetes, and pre-eclampsia. 

To see how serious your risk for developing heart disease is, take this test on the Cardiac Health Foundation of Canada’s website. 

What Are the Symptoms of Cardiovascular Disease?

Since there are multiple types of heart disease, there specific sets of symptoms for each condition. Some of the most common symptoms across the board include:

  • Shortness of breath
  • Chest discomfort, tightness, and/or pain
  • Increased or decreased heart beat

According to the Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada, women commonly experience heart attacks and heart disease without any pain or discomfort in the chest. It’s important for women to be aware of other symptoms, such as extreme fatigue, lightheadedness, and upper back pressure. 

How to Prevent Cardiovascular Disease

There are several ways you can reduce your lifestyle risk factors for developing cardiovascular disease. In fact, if more Canadians reduced their lifestyle risk factors, we could prevent over 80 per cent of premature heart disease cases.

So, here are some of the ways you can prevent heart disease:

1. Eat a Nutritious Diet

Your heart’s health depends on your diet being full of nutrients and minerals. Focus on lowering your cholesterol levels, controlling your triglycerides, and maintaining a healthy weight. For instance, the Heart and Stroke Foundation recommends eating 7-10 servings of vegetables per day.

2. Engage in Regular Physical Activity

You don’t have to spend hours at the gym each day to prevent heart disease. However, getting 30 minutes of physical activity each day is key. That could mean going for walks, runs, bike rides, dancing, doing yoga, stretching, or any other physical activity you enjoy. 

3. Reduce Your Vices

Not all vices, just smoking tobacco, drinking alcohol, and living in an overly stressed state. In addition to quitting smoking and limiting your alcohol consumption, be mindful of your stress levels. Consider learning mindfulness techniques to help you cope with stress. 

Take Care of Your Heart

Wildflower Health and Wellness cares about your heart’s health. Some of the ways we can help you prevent heart disease are with our naturopathic services. Managing stress, hormones, and eating a balanced, nutritious diet benefit all your organs, not in the least your heart. 

Get in touch with us today to learn more. 

Wildflower Health and Wellness When Being Fine Isn't Enough

When Being “Fine” Isn’t Good Enough 

Meet patient T, who recently shared this with me:

“I know my doctor, friends, family all tell me I look fine, but I don’t feel fine on the inside. Something feels off and my GP doesn’t seem to have answers for me anymore.”

Patient T is your parent, your sibling, your friend, you, me. Patient T is all of us.

Imagine a doctor’s visit where your appointment time is respected and while you wait you enjoy something to drink in a comfortable space. Your appointment is long enough to discuss your health concerns and you aren’t rushed out of the room before you have finished speaking.  Your treatment plan is explained to you in a way that allows you to understand your body. 

[bt_highlight]This approach to health is exactly what naturopathic medicine takes.[/bt_highlight]

 


 

At Wildflower Health & Wellness, there are a few guiding principles that allow us to make the best decisions possible for your health goals. 

Finding the best version of you

No two bodies are the same and therefore, no two people are treated the same. While certain conditions will have typical recommendations based on science and traditional knowledge, the combination of those medicines will be unique to your needs and preferences. Your one-of-a-kind body will respond differently based on your genetics, physiology, emotional health and lifestyle factors. Trust that we will ask the right questions when it comes to helping you discover your best health. 

 

 

 

A ‘less is more’ approach

We believe that health doesn’t come from the quantity of pills you take, but rather the small, simple, sustainable life habits that keep your body/mind well. Health works best when it’s simple for you to commit to – day in and day out. You will not find us selling unnecessary supplements or services because we believe in the tools we use to work on the people we recommend them for. 

 

We know seeing a new doctor can be exciting and a little scary; we closely work with you during the crucial first steps in your journey so that you never leave our office overwhelmed. As your health continues to improve, our check-ins will become less frequent. Don’t forget to come by and say hello while you’re out there living your absolutely best life! Once we’ve hit your goal, trust that you will be maintaining those results for the years to come.

 

Making the time for you

Your health is important to us and we take the time to deep dive into your current health concerns, your past medical history and what your best health would look/feel like. Your appointment time reflects the efforts we take in exploring your symptom presentation, assessments, laying out the course of treatment and an explanation of what’s working and what isn’t. You will soon find that your burning questions are answered and you are equipped with the tools in developing your best health. 

 

Looking long term

You might find us asking questions that don’t quite make sense to you, however, our approach to health is comprehensive. Even though you may be in the office for a particular concern, we feel that it is our job to ensure that we check in on all aspects of health, not just one body system. Naturally, we want to help you with your pressing health concerns but also your long term health. Why wait until you have a disease if we can see the early signs and symptoms either on your blood work or through physical exams. Your current health goals will be taken care of, as well as, your future health.

 

The best of both worlds

You don’t have to choose between seeing a naturopath and your family doctor. We believe in a collaborative approach to health. Oftentimes the best clinical outcomes occur when you have multiple eyes on your case where each practitioner views your health from a different perspective. Your family doctor ensures that your health is up to par, while your naturopath will ensure that your future health is being protected and provides you with the most effective natural solutions. We work easily with family doctors and specialists for the benefit of your health and peace of mind.

 

You have a seat at the table

While we are the experts of health, you are the expert of your body. Everyone has different levels of commitment to their health and we recognize the importance of acknowledging that. During your time with us we will give you our best professional advice based on current evidence and your past experiences. Our treatment plans are flexible to suit your needs and preferences. You may like working more with a diet & lifestyle approach or you may prefer a supplemental approach or maybe even a combination. The bottom line is that you get to make an informed decision on the options that best fit your lifestyle. Our job is to give you professional advice and you do the heavy lifting when it comes to follow through, as such, you deserve an opinion in your treatment plan. 

[bt_highlight]Have a seat at our table, and let’s talk about how we can create a plan for your life-long wellness.[/bt_highlight]

If accepting the phrase “you’re fine” isn’t good enough then you should consider the naturopathic approach to health. If our values on health resonates with you, then we’d be honoured to help you with your health concerns.

Call us at your convenience at (905) 951 7134. We’ll be glad to hear from you! 

You can book a complimentary “discovery consult” visit by calling the clinic or booking online. You’ll be able to ask questions, find out how we can help, and see if there’s a comfortable fit with your naturopath.

 

Finding Calm in the Chaos

What your naturopath is doing right now.

 

I’m not sure about you, but for me the days blend together and it all actually feels like 1 long day. The world feels dangerous and the threat is invisible. 

We’ve all had our lives affected by COVID-19 and the fallout is going to continue for some time. Uncertain times, such as now, can always trigger the difficult feelings of worry, nervousness and panic. It can feel as if you are spiraling out and the result is feeling a lack of control; that in turn, sets off the emotional and mental alarm bells causing what we call anxiety.

Read More

teacher's desk filling with books and causing stress

The Ultimate End-of-Summer Checklist for Teachers

You can hear the morning bell ringing in your head. September is getting closer each day, and your stress is starting to build. If only there was a way to maintain your vacation zen all year round. Staying stress-free in September is a mighty goal, but is it possible? The resounding answer is yes, if you start working on your wellness now. Everything from your diet to your sleeping habits can affect your ability to show up energized and focused. Luckily, you can find a naturopath in Caledon at Wildflower Health & Wellness to make it easy for you. Learn how to boost and maintain your wellness so you can have a stress-free September; here is the ultimate wellness checklist for teachers.

 1. Plan Your Physical Activity

Getting active in the summer is much easier than during the school year. You have the time and flexibility to work out at different times of day in different locations. One day you’re jogging at the cottage, the next is late-morning yoga. Staying active is crucial for your energy levels. If you want to feel energized and alert in class, maintain a physical activity routine. 

While it’s still summer, start experimenting with different types of workouts. You could try kickboxing, swimming, weight-lifting or even tai chi. The only thing you need to make sure of is that each option has is a time slot that works with your school schedule. Will you be waking up extra early to work out or going straight from school? Find a workout facility that’s near your home or near the school you work at. Ensure they have classes at the times that suit you or an open gym all day. 

 2. Improve Your Sleeping Habits

Inadequate sleep is one of the top reasons you might lack energy during the day. In the summer it’s not a big deal, especially when you can sleep in and go to bed as late as you like. Come September, that switch could be intense. It’s best to start working on your sleeping patterns now so you’re prepared for the first day of school.

Address whatever’s preventing you from getting a good night sleep. Is it your stress and anxiety? Are you restless and uncomfortable? Do you fall asleep easily but have trouble getting into a deep sleep? These are all common sleep concerns facing teachers. Slowly get back into the schedule of going to bed on time and waking up when you need to for school. Then, learn how to handle the causes of your restlessness. For many teachers, lifestyle counselling is an effective way to figure out the underlying cause of their sleepless nights and learn how to fix it. Consult a naturopath in Caledon for lifestyle counselling and solutions to your sleeping troubles.   

 3. Address Your Low Energy

Sometimes it’s not just your lack of sleep causing you to have low energy. It could be a myriad of things relating to your health. If you want to be on your toes and keeping up with your students, consider getting the following tested: reproductive hormones, food sensitivity, and your digestive function panel. 

When your reproductive hormones aren’t balanced your metabolism is affected. For women, this can cause severely heavy periods which cause low energy and fatigue. In either sex, there could be an imbalance in your thyroid hormones which causes fatigue as well. 

Food sensitivity testing can show you which foods you have intolerances to. When your body consumes certain foods, it could become fatigued as a result of your sensitivity.  

If you’re experiencing signs of malabsorption, you should have your digestive panel assessed. Fatigue and low energy are sometimes the results of essential nutrients from your food not getting absorbed. Consult your naturopath in Caledon to know which of these tests is best suited to your unique circumstance.   

 4. Start Meal Planning & Prepping

The last thing you want to worry about during the school week is what you’ll be having for dinner. Take that burden off your plate by meal planning and prepping. It’s crucial that you get a balanced and nutritious diet as a teacher. Relying on fast food and processed foods will result in energy crashes and serious tiredness. 

On the weekend, research meals that are both delicious and nutritious. Do your grocery shopping and prepare your meals for the week. That could mean cooking a big pot of stew for your lunches or pre-cutting vegetables for your mid-morning snacks. The idea is to get as much of the legwork done on the weekend so your school nights are less hectic. Plus, if you have a plan for each dinner of the week, you’ll be less tempted to get fast food or a different unhealthy option.    

5. Decrease Your Stress

There are tons of ways to decrease your stress as a teacher. The top way is staying organized and prepared for the days ahead of you. When you fall behind, your stress levels go through the roof. Many teachers find calendar blocking helpful when trying to get everything done. Assign each hour on your calendar to a task, some of which are for preparation and organization.

Make sure you also assign time for your health and wellness. If you don’t make yourself a priority, the students will sense it; they’ll spot your tiredness and stress. Be the best teacher you can be for them and for yourself. That could mean getting weekly acupuncture sessions or B12 injections. Take time to do things you enjoy outside of teaching, like singing karaoke or walking your dog. The key is to schedule those things in like you do your work tasks so that you’re more likely to do them. 

teacher stressing about school

Are You Ready to Start Checking Off Those Wellness Boxes? 

Don’t let the end-of-summer blues get you down. You can have an amazing school year if you prioritize your health and wellness. Staying energized and focused during the school year is a challenge for all teachers, but it doesn’t have to be. Start working through the ultimate wellness checklist for teachers above. Then, consult a professional and experienced naturopath in Caledon to make the most of each step.

Wildflower Health & Wellness is the top naturopathic clinic in Caledon, Bolton, Tottenham and Kleinburg. Our talented practitioners specialize in helping teachers get prepped for the stressful school year ahead. To learn about our services, send us a message or give us a call at (905) 951-7134.

Holiday Mayhem

[bt_section][bt_row][bt_column width=”1/1″][bt_text]

Merry Stress Management

We’ve all been there. You’re standing in line at a crowded shopping mall, there aren’t enough cashiers, and the line is moving unbelievably slow. It took more than 15 minutes to find a parking spot and now you’re running late but it’s okay because the sound system is blaring Mariah Carey’s “All I want for Christmas is you,” right?

For many, the winter holidays mark a festive but also difficult time. It seems like everything demands our attention. Work deadlines to end off the year, pressure to buy well-received gifts, financial stress, unwanted conversations with family and not to mention the regular regimen of eating healthy and exercising. It’s a unique time because after the holiday season, this stress will go away. It’s the same stress that is also a predictable stress that we have the power to manage. In a survey conducted by Healthline in 2015, 62% of people surveyed reported elevated stress levels during the holidays, while 10% reported no stress whatsoever. Great for that 10%, but what can the majority do to thrive this holiday season?

…62% of people surveyed reported elevated stress levels during the holidays…

1. Making a list, checking it twice

Whether you are naughty or nice, make a list of what needs to be done. By writing it down you effectively declutter your mind and ensures that you don’t forget key tasks. Having your to-do list swirl around in your head will inevitably ensure that random tasks will pop up at the wrong time when you are already doing a million things or when you’re trying to catch some z’s. While pen and paper works the best, you can also use a notes app on your smartphone.

it’s perfectly okay to not be in the Christmas spirit.

2. Channel kind Grinch vibes

The Grinch vibe is to say no. Despite what you are told, it’s perfectly okay to not be in the Christmas spirit. In plain terms, you can say no to obligations/responsibilities. Yes, it is possible to say no from a kind place, unlike the Grinch. Adding obligations to your plate might seems like a good idea to channel the holiday/Christmas spirit, however the spirit should not be draining you or stop you from doing the things that you truly enjoy. This time more than any other time you should protect your valuable time and energy.

Ways to say no:

  • “Thank you for thinking of me. I have this project that I am working on right now.”
  • “I am fully committed to doing this task before I can take on anything else.”
  • “Thank you for inviting me, unfortunately I can’t make it out to the Christmas party this year.”

3. Family time

If it’s uncomfortable to be around family because you may be avoiding some members and/or conversations, then keep in mind that the holidays are a time for families to get together and enjoy each other’s company. Stick to activities that you can jointly enjoy and/or areas of conversation that are of interest to both parties. Be mindful of your words and avoid combative language. Keep in mind that you can have a conversation someone without having the same perspective. Accept that you may not change the other person’s mind which will ease the tension in conversation. When all else fails, you can end a conversation before you see it turning hostile and change the topic to something you do agree upon.

For some people the holidays mark a sad time when there may be missing family members who have passed away. During this time, gift yourself some TLC without isolating yourself. While you don’t have to force yourself to be happy, you can take a walk, get some air, acknowledge your grief and talk to a trusted friend or family member.

4. Deck the halls with self care

Because the holiday season requires us to take on more responsibility than usual, our brain goes into overdrive. It may be acceptable for us to let go of personal health habits to complete other activities (ex: skipping exercise because of late working hours). Your daily routine is how you take care of your mind and body. It may include things such as physical activity, a cup of tea, journaling, getting to bed at a decent hour. Does it make sense to let go of your routine during the most stressful time of year? During the holidays you can keep your mental and physical stability by continuing your self care routine. Things may shift around a bit and you may skip some days but don’t toss your routine out of the window completely.

5. Presents under the tree

Are you also a well-deserving? YES! Be kind to yourself and give yourself a gift every day!

Self care gift ideas:
  • Take some time off of work to do something you enjoy
  • Sleep in for one day
  • Learn something new (ex: new recipe, new way to wrap presents, etc.)
  • Reminisce about good memories from the past year
  • Reflect on the passing year and make some goals for next year
  • Laugh! Watch a comedy show
  • Take advantage of your health benefits before the year ends

Stress around the holidays can come out in different ways. For some it can be difficulty concentrating, difficulty making decisions, feeling angry, irritable or out of control, experiencing headaches, poor energy, or body aches and pains. Pay attention to your stress signals and take care of yourself.

Happy Holidays!

[/bt_text][bt_hr top_spaced=”topSmallSpaced” bottom_spaced=”bottomSmallSpaced” transparent_border=”noBorder” el_class=”” el_style=”” responsive=””][/bt_hr][bt_row_inner][bt_column_inner width=”1/1″ align=”center” cell_padding=”default” vertical_align=”inherit” highlight=”no_highlight” background_color=”” opacity=”” el_class=”” el_style=””][bt_button text=”Stress Management Starts Here – Work with WHW” icon=”” url=”https://wildflowerhw.janeapp.com/” target=”_self” style=”Outline” icon_position=”Inline” color=”Accent” size=”Medium” width=”Normal” el_class=”” el_style=”” responsive=””][/bt_button][/bt_column_inner][/bt_row_inner][bt_hr top_spaced=”topSmallSpaced” bottom_spaced=”bottomSemiSpaced” transparent_border=”noBorder” el_class=”” el_style=”” responsive=””][/bt_hr][bt_dropdown title=”References” dd_content=”American Psychological Association: https://www.apa.org/helpcenter/stress-conversations.aspx
American Psychological Association: https://www.apa.org/helpcenter/holiday-stress.aspx

Havard Medical School: http://neuro.hms.harvard.edu/harvard-mahoney-neuroscience-institute/brain-newsletter/and-brain-series/holiday-stress-and-brain” el_class=”” el_style=”” responsive=””][/bt_dropdown][bt_hr top_spaced=”topSmallSpaced” bottom_spaced=”bottomSemiSpaced” transparent_border=”noBorder” el_class=”” el_style=”” responsive=””][/bt_hr][/bt_column][/bt_row][/bt_section]

Postpartum Support

[bt_section][bt_row][bt_column width=”1/1″ align=”left” vertical_align=”inherit” border=”no_border” cell_padding=”btDoublePadding” animation=”no_animation” text_indent=”no_text_indent” highlight=”no_highlight” background_color=”” opacity=”” inner_background_color=”” background_image=”” el_class=”” el_style=””][bt_text]

Pelvic Floor Physiotherapy Postpartum

Ever wonder why pelvic floor physiotherapy has stirred up some great conversation topics amongst friends and family with little ones? After giving birth, a woman’s body, in particular her pelvic floor, has gone through an array of changes. Whether you’ve had a vaginal or cesarean birth, the pelvic floor and other soft tissue structures surrounding have been affected. Other determinants that can affect your pelvic floor structures include the size of your baby, the duration of labour, the delivery method used, and the number or pregnancies you’ve had.

Take a look at the statements below, do any of these sound familiar?

“I am peeing my pants when I laugh, cough, sneeze or jump!”

“I am noticing doming of my belly when lifting my child or rolling out of bed”

“I had a c-section and I can’t stand looking at my scar, it also hurts to touch.”

“It hurts to have intercourse.”

“I’m nervous to have intercourse again, I don’t know what it’s like down there after the baby.”

“I feel like there’s a golf ball pushing out of my vagina.”

“I want to get back into the gym, but not sure what exercises to do and not do at this point.”

If any of these statements or thoughts have crossed your mind since having your baby, a visit to see the pelvic floor physiotherapist is a MUST!

Checklist

Here is a simple checklist that you can also use to see whether or not you should pick up the phone and make an appointment with your physiotherapist:

Ο   6 weeks after having a vaginal birth

Ο   8 weeks after having a cesarean section

Ο   Diagnosed with Diastasis Recti or “Mummy Tummy”

Ο   Experiencing urinary or fecal incontinence

Ο   Diagnosed with a POP (pelvic organ prolapse)

Ο   Pelvic pain with or without intercourse

Ο   Getting back to the gym, running, etc.

Ο   Lower back pain, hip pain, shoulder pain

Ο   Episiotomy performed during delivery

Ο   Any grade 1-4 tearing during labour and delivery

If, after having your six-week follow up with your doctor, OBGYN, and/or midwife, any of the above have been mentioned, seeing a pelvic floor physiotherapist can impact the healing and function of your pelvic structures after having your baby. The results of regular physiotherapy treatment for a minimum of an 8-week period have demonstrated positive tissue healing and a strong, functional pelvic floor regardless of complications with birth.

– Nabila Jutha, PT

[/bt_text][bt_hr top_spaced=”topSmallSpaced” bottom_spaced=”bottomSmallSpaced” transparent_border=”noBorder” el_class=”” el_style=”” responsive=””][/bt_hr][bt_row_inner][bt_column_inner width=”1/1″ align=”center” cell_padding=”default” vertical_align=”inherit” highlight=”no_highlight” background_color=”” opacity=”” el_class=”” el_style=””][bt_button text=”Postpartum Recovery Starts Here – Work with WHW!” icon=”” url=”https://wildflowerhw.janeapp.com/” target=”_self” style=”Outline” icon_position=”Inline” color=”Accent” size=”Medium” width=”Normal” el_class=”” el_style=”” responsive=””][/bt_button][/bt_column_inner][/bt_row_inner][bt_hr top_spaced=”topSmallSpaced” bottom_spaced=”bottomSemiSpaced” transparent_border=”noBorder” el_class=”” el_style=”” responsive=””][/bt_hr][bt_dropdown title=”References” dd_content=”Allen, R., Hosker, G., Smith, A. and Warrell, D. (1991). Pelvic Floor Damage and Childbirth. Obstetrical & Gynecological Survey, 46(4), pp.209-210.;#
Handa, V., Blomquist, J., McDermott, K., Friedman, S. and Muñoz, A. (2012). Pelvic Floor Disorders After Childbirth: Effect of Episiotomy, Perineal Laceration, and Operative Birth. Obstetrics & Gynecology, 119(2, Part 1), pp.233-239.;#
Morkved, S. and Bo, K. (2000). Effect of postpartum pelvic floor muscle training in prevention and treatment of urinary incontinence: a one-year follow up. BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, 107(8), pp.1022-1028.;#” el_class=”” el_style=”” responsive=””][/bt_dropdown][bt_hr top_spaced=”topSmallSpaced” bottom_spaced=”bottomSemiSpaced” transparent_border=”noBorder” el_class=”” el_style=”” responsive=””][/bt_hr][/bt_column][/bt_row][/bt_section]